The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued final Guidance regarding Public Warning and Notification of Recalls Under 21 CFR Part 7, Subpart C. The document makes limited changes to the Draft Guidance that was issued in January 2018. The Guidance outlines circumstances when a company should issue a public warning about a voluntary recall, describes the general timeframe for companies to issue such a warning, discusses what information should be included in a public warning, and describes situations where the FDA may take action to issue its own public warning should a company’s warning be deemed insufficient. The document’s recommendations apply to all voluntary recalls, including both firm-initiated and FDA-requested recalls, and covers foods and dietary supplements (as well as all other FDA-regulated products).

This blog provides background for FDA’s development of the Guidance, as well as a high-level summary of the Guidance’s recommendations. Click here to read more.

On December 22, 2018, funding expired for certain agencies within the federal government, including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). These agencies will be operating under significantly reduced functions until the shutdown ends, i.e., until Congress passes a new appropriations bill providing funding for these agencies. This post provides a summary of the scope of each of these agencies’ operations during the shutdown, as well as the implications for the food and other consumer product industries.

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued final Guidance regarding its mandatory recall authority, which was granted to FDA by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).  Together with the release of this Guidance, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., released a statement addressing FDA’s goal of expanding use of the mandatory recall authority in cases where FDA has to intervene quickly to help protect consumers from unsafe foods.

The Guidance outlines how the FDA will give the responsible party an opportunity to conduct a voluntary recall before ordering a mandatory recall, as the law requires. It also offers more detail about the evidence or circumstances the FDA may consider when deciding to move forward with a mandatory food recall and provides clarity around situations when the FDA would deem a food a serious health risk. Commissioner Gottlieb’s statement explains that providing this additional clarity can enable the FDA to make more robust use of the mandatory recall authority.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued Draft Guidance on public warning and notification of recalls under 21 C.F.R. Part 7, and has announced steps to release recall information more quickly. The Draft Guidance provides recommendations to industry and FDA staff regarding the use, content, and circumstances for issuing public warnings and public notifications, and also discusses the parties responsible for issuing public warnings.  The document’s recommendations apply to all voluntary recalls, including both firm-initiated and FDA-requested recalls, and covers food, dietary supplements, and cosmetics (and other FDA-regulated products). Importantly, the Draft Guidance discusses the release of retail consignee information as a part of public warnings of recalls and signals that there may be more to come from FDA in this area. In addition, FDA issued a blog post, reflecting the Draft Guidance, announcing that the agency has adopted a new policy to release recall information in FDA’s weekly Enforcement Report, even when the recall has not yet been classified.

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