The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced yesterday two policies to provide flexibility with respect to nutrition labeling requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic. First, the agency committed to work cooperatively with all manufacturers for the remainder of the year regarding the use of updated Nutrition and Supplement Facts labels and will not focus on

On December 31, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued two final guidance documents to assist industry with compliance with the agency’s updated Nutrition Facts labeling regulations. The first final guidance, entitled, “Guidance for Industry: Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed At One Eating Occasion, Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed, Serving

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated its “Industry Resources on the Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label” webpage questions and answers,1 stating that the agency does not intend to take enforcement actions related to the new nutrition labeling requirements for the first six months following the January 1, 2020 compliance date

Oatly, Inc. has chosen to discontinue its “no added sugars” advertising claims after the Campbell Soup Company brought a challenge before the National Advertising Division (NAD). Campbell argued that various claims found on Oatly oatmilk products, including “0 g added sugars” and “no added sugars,” were misleading because the products contain maltose, a sugar by-product

Yesterday, FSIS issued its long-awaited guidance on the labeling and packaging of “kit” products. Although FSIS has long informally applied its “kit policy,” this FSIS Compliance Guideline marks the first public guidance that FSIS has provided on the topic. The Compliance Guideline generally reflects the Agency’s informal policy without significant change.

Under its kit policy,

On June 18, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued its final guidance document on added sugars labeling for (1) honey, maple syrup, and other single-ingredient sugars and syrups; and (2) certain cranberry products. In this blog post, we summarize the FDA’s guidance on the added sugars declaration for each type of product. Notably, for

Today the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued draft guidance announcing that the agency intends to exercise enforcement discretion to allow the use of “potassium chloride salt” as an alternative common or usual name for “potassium chloride.” Potassium chloride is often used as a partial substitute for sodium chloride (i.e., salt) to facilitate sodium reduction

We are writing this memo to bring to your attention that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a new final guidance titled: “Preparation of Food Contact Notifications for Food Contact Substances in Contact with Infant Formula and/or Human Milk” (FCN Guidance). The guidance contains recommendations regarding how the scientific information in food contact