Photo of Veronica Colas

Senior Associate, Washington, D.C.

Veronica Colas counsels clients on the regulations and policy issues affecting food companies from farm to table. She represents all segments of the food industry, including manufacturers, retailers, restaurants, and food service companies, as well as their trade associations.
Veronica provides clear advice and practical solutions for compliance with labeling, advertising, and safety regulations from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Consumer Product Safety Commission.

A core part of Veronica's practice is helping clients develop new products, label claims, advertising materials, and promotional campaigns, with a keen awareness of today's litigation environment. She has a deep understanding of both current and forthcoming food labeling and production requirements, from nutrition and menu labeling, to the regulatory issues surrounding genetically engineered foods and organic food production.

Veronica also has significant experience in helping clients navigate regulatory enforcement challenges, such as Warning Letters, import detentions, and investigations by the Federal Trade Commission, Department of Justice, Congress, and state Attorneys General. She works closely with trade associations and food companies to craft comments and develop strategies in response to agency rulemaking and other public policy issues. She is a frequent speaker and contributor to industry publications.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is seeking comments on recommendations to update the List of Bioengineered Foods (List) under the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS). AMS seeks comment on four issues: (1) whether it should add insect-resistant sugarcane to the List; (2) whether it should add the modifier “virus-resistant”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) issued two final guidance documents providing industry stakeholders with instructions on how to implement certain requirements of the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS). The agency’s Guidance to Ensure Acceptable Validation of a Refining Process outlines steps for validating that a refining process makes modified

On May 22, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced two policies to provide temporary flexibility with respect to packaged foods formulation and labeling requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic. The agency’s guidance document is entitled “Temporary Policy Regarding Certain Labeling Requirements During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency: Minor Formulation Changes and Vending Machines”

A recent court decision struck down a 2018 final rule by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which had relaxed sodium and whole grains requirements for the National School Lunch Program and National School Breakfast Program (school meals programs). The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and Healthy

In March, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued guidance documents, first revised on March 27, temporarily relaxing certain regulatory requirements for the production of alcohol-based hand sanitizers, to respond to the increased demand for hand sanitizer products during the novel coronavirus crisis. Yesterday, FDA issued additional minor updates to these documents. Notably, FDA provides

Today, FDA issued a new guidance document that provides retailers with some flexibility from labeling requirements for shell eggs in order to facilitate the distribution of eggs during the COVID-19 pandemic. This guidance provides a basis for retail food establishments to sell unlabeled cartons or flats of shell eggs during the public health emergency if

As the novel coronavirus crisis continues to escalate, the demand for hygienic products such as hand sanitizer has dramatically increased. In response, many businesses, such as food and industrial and beverage alcohol manufacturers, are seeking to produce alcohol-based hand sanitizers using certain food grade materials, or to produce alcohol to be used in production of

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced yesterday two policies to provide flexibility with respect to nutrition labeling requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic. First, the agency committed to work cooperatively with all manufacturers for the remainder of the year regarding the use of updated Nutrition and Supplement Facts labels and will not focus on

On September 27, 2019 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hosted a public meeting to gather information from stakeholders on changes the agency could make to existing standards of identity (SOIs), particularly changes that could be made across categories of standardized foods (i.e., “horizontal” changes), to provide flexibility for the development of healthier foods

On September 26, 2019, the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC’s or the Commission’s) Bureau of Consumer Protection (BCP) held a public workshop on “Made in USA” and similar U.S.-origin claims for consumer goods sold in the United States. This is the first time the Commission has sought public input on its approach to such claims since