This post summarizes recent actions the federal government has taken in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. First, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has updated its guidance identifying the types of food and agriculture sector workers who the agency suggests should be exempt from state and local shelter in place orders, curfews, and similar restrictions on movement. We previously summarized an earlier iteration of the guidance in our memo on March 20, 2020. Second, FDA supplemented its questions and answers guidance with additional material concerning food packaging, testing food processing facility environments for COVID-19, and flexibility for nutrition labeling of packaged food during the COVID-19 pandemic. The guidance continues to state that currently there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. Third, FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) has issued a Fact Sheet on how unused human food may safely be used as animal food during the COVID-19 outbreak.

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Photo of Elizabeth Fawell Elizabeth Fawell

Partner, Washington, D.C.

Elizabeth Fawell navigates the detailed, and often complex, regulatory issues confronting food companies and helps them understand both the rules and various risks involved so that they can make informed business decisions. Elizabeth works with every segment of the food…

Partner, Washington, D.C.

Elizabeth Fawell navigates the detailed, and often complex, regulatory issues confronting food companies and helps them understand both the rules and various risks involved so that they can make informed business decisions. Elizabeth works with every segment of the food industry, including manufacturers, distributors, retailers, restaurants, and food service operators; and their trade associations.  Elizabeth’s work on behalf of food industry clients with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) since its inception and her understanding of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems provides her with the experience and perspective needed as she counsels clients on how to comply with new requirements under the law. Elizabeth is a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) and has completed the FSPCA PCQI training.

Elizabeth knows how laws, regulations, and guidance documents are developed, interpreted, and enforced. Her extensive knowledge enables clients to prevent and respond to enforcement actions such as Warning Letters, Import Alerts, and agency investigations. She helps clients in determining whether an RFR is necessary and whether a recall is warranted. If so, she helps manage the recall to minimize business impacts. Elizabeth provides real-time advice during factory inspections, helps clients prepare 483 responses, and drafts inspection manuals. She also assists clients in lawfully and creatively promoting their products; such as the development of labels, claims, and website and promotional campaigns. Elizabeth also supports clients in advertising disputes and with responses to FTC and Attorney General investigations.

Elizabeth helps clients stay informed of and ahead of public policy issues and develops strategies for effective advocacy before regulators. She also counsels clients on compliance with Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) safety standards, testing and certification requirements, and reporting obligations.

Elizabeth is a member of the Food and Dietary Supplements Committee of the Food and Drug Law Institute.

Photo of Brian Eyink Brian Eyink

Counsel, Washington, D.C.

Drawing on experience throughout the supply chain — from animal production to food processing to distribution and retail sale — Brian Eyink brings vast and cross-cutting industry knowledge to help clients find practical solutions to regulatory problems. Brian is particularly…

Counsel, Washington, D.C.

Drawing on experience throughout the supply chain — from animal production to food processing to distribution and retail sale — Brian Eyink brings vast and cross-cutting industry knowledge to help clients find practical solutions to regulatory problems. Brian is particularly sensitive to risk management issues as companies adapt to a regulatory and political environment increasingly focused on inspections, enforcement, and investigations.

Brian helps food and agriculture companies navigate increasingly complex and high-stakes federal and state regulatory issues. He draws on deep experience with the USDA, FDA, and FTC, as well as state, local, and self-regulatory bodies, litigation, and acquisitions to solve clients’ regulatory and business problems. Brian advises clients on the full scope of regulatory issues facing the food and agriculture sectors, ranging from USDA and FDA enforcement actions and federal investigations to regulatory compliance, import and export issues, litigation support, comment preparation, legislative drafting, policy development, trade association governance, advertising disputes, and labeling issues.

Brian also represents food and agriculture trade associations, advising on issues including general counseling and governance, influencing policy and public perspective, and implementation of industry initiatives.

Before joining Hogan Lovells, Brian served as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Gerald Bard Tjoflat of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. While in law school, he served as an executive editor of the Duke Law Journal.

Photo of Leigh Barcham Leigh Barcham

Senior Associate, Washington, D.C.

Leigh Barcham provides business-oriented legal and policy solutions to food and agriculture companies and trade associations. She advises clients on state and federal regulatory issues that may arise throughout the entire food production line from farm to table. Leigh…

Senior Associate, Washington, D.C.

Leigh Barcham provides business-oriented legal and policy solutions to food and agriculture companies and trade associations. She advises clients on state and federal regulatory issues that may arise throughout the entire food production line from farm to table. Leigh also guides clients in consumer products industries as they navigate federal advertising laws and regulations.
When she joined Hogan Lovells, Leigh brought with her more than five years of public policy experience. A part-time student by night and a law clerk by day, Leigh worked throughout law school at a firm in Washington, D.C., focusing on legislation and federal regulation affecting the energy industry. Before law school she served as a policy analyst for international affairs and climate change at the White House Council on Environmental Quality.