The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reached a settlement with the two consumer groups that sued FDA in October 2018 to compel the agency to implement the traceability provisions in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The consent order, which was approved by the district court judge on June 11, 2019, establishes a timeline for FDA to publish a list of high-risk foods and engage in rulemaking setting forth additional traceability recordkeeping requirements for facilities that manufacture, process, pack, or hold those foods. The lawsuit was brought in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California by the Center for Food Safety (CFS) and Center for Environmental Health (CEH). This memorandum provides background on the FSMA traceability provisions and then summarizes the consent order. As explained in more detail below, FDA is committing to designate the list of high-risk foods and issue a proposed rule that would establish recordkeeping requirements for these foods by September 8, 2020, and then issue the final rule by November 7, 2022.

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Photo of Maile Hermida Maile Hermida

Partner, Washington, DC

Maile Gradison Hermida represents all segments of the food industry and their trade associations. She has a keen understanding of the issues affecting the industry, from product development through production, distribution, and retail sale. Her core practice involves helping companies ensure they are in compliance with regulations from federal agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Maile also provides strategic advice on public policy issues, frequently involving agency rulemakings.

Maile has considerable experience with the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), having worked with numerous companies and trade associations on all aspects of the law since the day it was signed. She translates her in-depth knowledge of FSMA into practical solutions for companies working on implementation strategies. She also is a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI), as well as a Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance Lead Instructor for the PCQI training.

Additionally, Maile assists companies with matters involving regulatory enforcement. She helps clients navigate product recalls; government inspections; and other enforcement actions, such as Warning Letters and import detentions. Maile also advises clients on the development of label and advertising claims, as well as labeling requirements for foods and dietary supplements.

Maile is a frequent speaker and contributor to industry publications. Prior to joining Hogan Lovells, she served as a judicial clerk to the Honorable Charles F. Lettow of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. Maile graduated with high honors from The George Washington University Law School, where she served as executive editor of The George Washington Law Review.

Photo of Elizabeth Fawell Elizabeth Fawell

Partner, Washington, DC

Elizabeth Fawell navigates the detailed, and often complex, regulatory issues confronting food companies and helps them understand both the rules and various risks involved so that they can make informed business decisions. Elizabeth works with every segment of the food industry, including manufacturers, distributors, retailers, restaurants, and food service operators; and their trade associations.  Elizabeth’s work on behalf of food industry clients with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) since its inception and her understanding of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems provides her with the experience and perspective needed as she counsels clients on how to comply with new requirements under the law. Elizabeth is a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) and has completed the FSPCA PCQI training.

Elizabeth knows how laws, regulations, and guidance documents are developed, interpreted, and enforced. Her extensive knowledge enables clients to prevent and respond to enforcement actions such as Warning Letters, Import Alerts, and agency investigations. She helps clients in determining whether an RFR is necessary and whether a recall is warranted. If so, she helps manage the recall to minimize business impacts. Elizabeth provides real-time advice during factory inspections, helps clients prepare 483 responses, and drafts inspection manuals. She also assists clients in lawfully and creatively promoting their products; such as the development of labels, claims, and website and promotional campaigns. Elizabeth also supports clients in advertising disputes and with responses to FTC and Attorney General investigations.

Elizabeth helps clients stay informed of and ahead of public policy issues and develops strategies for effective advocacy before regulators. She also counsels clients on compliance with Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) safety standards, testing and certification requirements, and reporting obligations.

Elizabeth is a member of the Food and Dietary Supplements Committee of the Food and Drug Law Institute.

Photo of Leigh Barcham Leigh Barcham

Associate, Washington, DC

Leigh Barcham provides business-oriented legal and policy solutions to food and agriculture companies and trade associations. She advises clients on state and federal regulatory issues that may arise throughout the entire food production line from farm to table. Leigh also guides clients in consumer products industries as they navigate federal advertising laws and regulations.
When she joined Hogan Lovells, Leigh brought with her more than five years of public policy experience. A part-time student by night and a law clerk by day, Leigh worked throughout law school at a firm in Washington, D.C., focusing on legislation and federal regulation affecting the energy industry. Before law school she served as a policy analyst for international affairs and climate change at the White House Council on Environmental Quality.